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Recipe of the Month

Southwestern potato skins

By Mayo Clinic staff
Serves 6

Ingredients

  • 6 large baking potatoes
  • 1 teaspoon olive oil
  • 1 teaspoon chili powder
  • 1/8 teaspoon Tabasco sauce
  • 6 slices turkey bacon, cooked until crisp, chopped
  • 1 medium tomato, diced
  • 2 tablespoons sliced green onions
  • 1/2 cup shredded cheddar cheese

Directions

Preheat the oven to 450 F. Lightly coat a baking sheet with cooking spray.

Scrub potatoes and prick each several times with a fork. Microwave uncovered on high until tender, about 10 minutes. Remove the potatoes from the microwave and place on a wire rack to cool. When cool to the touch, cut each potato in half lengthwise and scoop out the flesh, leaving about 1/4 inch of the flesh attached to the skin. (Save potato flesh for another meal.)

In a small bowl, whisk together the olive oil, chili powder and hot sauce. Brush the olive oil mixture on the insides of the potato skins. Cut each half of the potato skin in half again crosswise. Place the potatoes onto the baking sheet.

In a small bowl gently mix together the turkey bacon, tomato and onions. Fill each potato skin with this mixture and sprinkle each with cheese.

Bake until the cheese is melted and the potato skins are heated through, about 10 minutes. Serve immediately.

Nutritional analysis per serving

Serving size: 4 wedges
Calories 181 Sodium 199 mg
Total fat 5 g Total carbohydrate 28 g
Saturated fat 2 g Dietary fiber 5 g
Monounsaturated fat 2 g Protein 6 g
Cholesterol 20 mg  

Welcome to the IMA Wellness Blog. The blog format reflects our efforts to provide IMA members with timely, relevant and thought provoking information in a form that is accessible for easy reference. IMA’s Wellness Blog will be updated on a regular basis. Weekly news update emails will be sent out to notify subscribers of new information posted on the blog. IMA members are welcome to submit material for the blog, or request specific information. Simply email Editor Stefany Henson at shenson@ima-net.org with your information or request. Editorial submissions are subject to review. 

Wednesday
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Many offering new selections that have roughly 12 percent fewer calories, researchers report.

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New research shows that newer menu selections at many large chain restaurants in the United States now average 12 percent fewer calories than traditional dishes.

This switch could have a major impact on the nation’s obesity epidemic, the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health researchers said.

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p>From Healthfinder.gov …

When it comes to your heart, what you eat matters. Follow these tips for heart-healthy eating:

Eat less saturated and trans fat. Stay away from fatty meats, fried foods, cakes, and cookies.

Cut down on sodium (salt). Look for the low-sodium or “no salt added” types of canned soups, vegetables, snack foods, and lunch meats.

Get more fiber. Fiber is in vegetables, fruits, and whole grains.

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