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Recipe of the Month

Southwestern potato skins

By Mayo Clinic staff
Serves 6

Ingredients

  • 6 large baking potatoes
  • 1 teaspoon olive oil
  • 1 teaspoon chili powder
  • 1/8 teaspoon Tabasco sauce
  • 6 slices turkey bacon, cooked until crisp, chopped
  • 1 medium tomato, diced
  • 2 tablespoons sliced green onions
  • 1/2 cup shredded cheddar cheese

Directions

Preheat the oven to 450 F. Lightly coat a baking sheet with cooking spray.

Scrub potatoes and prick each several times with a fork. Microwave uncovered on high until tender, about 10 minutes. Remove the potatoes from the microwave and place on a wire rack to cool. When cool to the touch, cut each potato in half lengthwise and scoop out the flesh, leaving about 1/4 inch of the flesh attached to the skin. (Save potato flesh for another meal.)

In a small bowl, whisk together the olive oil, chili powder and hot sauce. Brush the olive oil mixture on the insides of the potato skins. Cut each half of the potato skin in half again crosswise. Place the potatoes onto the baking sheet.

In a small bowl gently mix together the turkey bacon, tomato and onions. Fill each potato skin with this mixture and sprinkle each with cheese.

Bake until the cheese is melted and the potato skins are heated through, about 10 minutes. Serve immediately.

Nutritional analysis per serving

Serving size: 4 wedges
Calories 181 Sodium 199 mg
Total fat 5 g Total carbohydrate 28 g
Saturated fat 2 g Dietary fiber 5 g
Monounsaturated fat 2 g Protein 6 g
Cholesterol 20 mg  

Welcome to the IMA Wellness Blog. The blog format reflects our efforts to provide IMA members with timely, relevant and thought provoking information in a form that is accessible for easy reference. IMA’s Wellness Blog will be updated on a regular basis. Weekly news update emails will be sent out to notify subscribers of new information posted on the blog. IMA members are welcome to submit material for the blog, or request specific information. Simply email Editor Stefany Henson at shenson@ima-net.org with your information or request. Editorial submissions are subject to review. 

Thursday
May262016

Seven Ways to Give Ticks the Slip

Don’t become the next meal for a disease-carrying parasite.

While only a few tick species infect people with diseases, the rising popularity of many outdoor activities and the spread of residential developments has upped the odds that one of those creepy parasites might latch on to you.

“Luckily, ticks don’t fly, jump or fall from the sky,” vector-borne disease expert Stephen Wikel said. He’s a professor emeritus of medical sciences at Quinnipiac University’s Frank H. Netter M.D. School of Medicine, in North Haven, Conn.

“They generally move from grass to a living host, and crawl upwards, looking for a warm, moist area to feed. Ticks also have incredible anti-detection defenses. For example, their saliva is loaded with antihistamines, anticoagulants and other inhibitors that prevent wound healing, and dampen pain and itch responses; unfed nymphs are so small, they can be mistaken for freckles,” he said.

Click to read more ...

Thursday
May262016

Do You Know the ‘Hidden’ Signs of Asthma?

Fewer than half aware that chest pain, trouble sleeping may indicate adult breathing trouble, survey finds.

While most people know that wheezing is a sign of asthma, far fewer realize that trouble sleeping or a persistent cough may also be symptoms of the airway disease, a new survey shows.

Those findings may help explain why many adults don’t realize they have the disease and don’t seek treatment, the researchers said. But, one in every 200 U.S. adults is diagnosed every year with asthma, a condition called adult-onset asthma, the researchers said.

Click to read more ...

Thursday
May192016

Walking Fido Is Doggone Good for Your Health

Host of benefits unleashed for older folks, researchers find.

Walking the dog may be a health boon for older Americans, new research suggests.

Dog walking helps cut back on excess weight and the overall need to visit a physician while raising overall moderate and vigorous exercise levels among the over-60 set, investigators found.

And the strong emotional bonds formed between owner and pet offer social benefits, encouraging increased contact with other pet owners.

“There is a wealth of evidence that walking is beneficial for people’s physical health,” said study lead author Angela Curl. She is an assistant professor in the department of family studies and social work at Miami University, in Oxford, Ohio.

Click to read more ...

Thursday
May192016

FDA to Re-examine What Makes a Food ‘Healthy’

Agency acknowledges changing standards, concerns

Which of these foods, if any, should be labeled “healthy”? Raisin bran? Avocados? Granola bars?

Going by current — and perhaps outdated — U.S. food-labeling regulations, it’s impossible to know, food makers and legislators contend. But that’s about to change under a U.S. Food and Drug Administration plan to redefine the definition of “healthy” foods.

“We believe now is an opportune time to reevaluate regulations concerning nutrient content claims, generally, including the term ‘healthy,’” the FDA said in a statement to the Wall Street Journal.

The process could take years, and will likely rely on public input. A bill in Congress, if approved, would urge the FDA to make this matter a priority, according to the news report.

The nutritional landscape and knowledge of what constitutes a healthy diet has changed considerably since 1994, when the FDA first officially used the term “healthy.” Back then, health advocates were taking aim at fats — not sugar or gluten — which are among today’s targets.

Click to read more ...

Thursday
May052016

Introducing . . . CDC’s Online Worksite Health ScoreCard 2.0

The CDC Worksite Health ScoreCards

CDC has unveiled its new and improved version of the Worksite Health ScoreCard, HSC 2.0, a tool that makes it easier for workplace health program managers to assess the overall health of their employees, plan strategies and interventions to improve their programs or introduce new programs, and evaluate workforce progress in key health areas on an ongoing basis. Some new features of the ScoreCard are: additional reports that will help employers measure their workforce’s health improvement against other employers, and email notifications when it’s time to complete their annual updates of the ScoreCard.

Read more and download tools here